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20110704
20110704
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
the pakistan border. this is a critical area for the insurgents and the cross border infiltration and this is a historic avenue for movement from pakistan into afghanistan. in terms of the risk to u.s. troops, how will you characterize this? >> there is a significant amount of influx of insurgent fighters in the area, mostly from pakistan moving into afghanistan. >> tell us a little bit about your mission. >> this the standard reconnaissance mission, along the historic route from pakistan. the terrain is inaccessible, so we are going there to see what this looks like for a future clearing operation. the major challenges the terrain, which is extreme and very difficult to move. and also, the people there have not seen the coalition presence in some time. >> what do you hope to achieve to the mission. >> to accept these conditions for future operations and build our awareness of the atmosphere, so that we can continue the operations there. this is for the clear insurgent presence in the area. >> how do you tell if you have succeeded? >> the numbers that occur in the area, we have re
coming in from pakistan. but it's day to day. they have seen progress and they think to themselves, yes, we're absolutely changing the way this army operates. i think there is a feeling that it's not the same day to day progress. >> you also joined the troops with they were unwinding at night after their day's mission. let's take a listen to that. >> reporter: because the americans have superior night vision, the taliban rarely attack at night. so after dark, it's time for maintenance, for hanging out and often just talking about the experiences they've had. >> i ran over there because we were going to go pick him up and then whether i got down there, i looked and seen he had his hand inside his throat. i was like all right, he's got him. and then what i just jumped on the 240 and started rocking that. then everybody showed up. they're like, yeah, we're going to take him. all right, let me know when you want me to fire. they're like go cycle. fine. challenge accepted. fireworks display. >> on the fourth of july. >> that was a preplanned fireworks display. i figured we would get it start
is in captivity. that's happened, for instance, in pakistan with a man named umar, a columnist, who was abducted and sexually assaulted. he was sodomized in retribution for his writing. >> warner: a lot of these victims at least the women, have never told their stories before to anyoee other than friends or family. why not? >> there are a number of reasons. the biggest one i heard from international correspondents was the fear of losing assignments. i have spoken to at least two journalists that told me that they were taken off assignments specifically because they came forward to talk about their sexual assault. so it really does happen. they don't want to be appear to be weak or vulnerable. women told me repeatedly that they had worked very hard to overcome this sense that they were the weaker gender in this profession and that them didn't feel that they could reveal that they had been raped without it making them look somehow more vulnerable.รงรง there are also.... >> warner: what about the local reporters? what were usually their reason for not saying anything? >> a lot of different cultura
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)